Feeding Jesus

Even before reading The Hole In Our Gospel this thought has been haunting me — Am I doing all that I can to help the last and the least?

  • Am I speaking up for the one with no voice?
  • Am I looking out for the one who’s been ignored?
  • Am I feeding the physically hungry?
  • Am I feeding the spiritually hungry?
  • Am I representing the cause of the marginalized and ignored?
  • Am I doing this everywhere I can?

Jesus made it quite clear: after my brief life here is over, He’s going to say one of two things to me. Either I took care of the least and the last, or I didn’t. There’s no middle ground. The conversation either sounds like this…

“I was hungry and you fed Me,
I was thirsty and you gave Me a drink,
I was homeless and you gave Me a room,
I was shivering and you gave Me clothes,
I was sick and you stopped to visit,
I was in prison and you came to Me,” Jesus will say.

“Master,” I will answer, “what are You talking about? When did I ever see You hungry and feed You, thirsty and give You a drink? And when did I ever see You sick or in prison and come to You?”

“Whenever you did one of these things to someone overlooked or ignored, that was Me — you did it to Me.”

Or like this…

“I was hungry and you gave Me no meal,
I was thirsty and you gave Me no drink,
I was homeless and you gave Me no bed,
I was shivering and you gave Me no clothes,
Sick and in prison, and you never visited,” Jesus will say.

“Master,” I will answer, “what are You talking about? When did I ever see You hungry or thirsty or homeless or shivering or sick or in prison and didn’t help?”

“Whenever you failed to do one of these things to someone who was being overlooked or ignored, that was Me — you failed to do it to Me.” (My paraphrase of Matthew 25:31-46)

Mother Teresa said that in the faces of the poor whom she served she saw “Christ, in His most distressing disguise.” My prayer is that God will open my eyes. I need to see the poor, the marginalized, the hungry and the suffering through their disguises. That’s Jesus who is poor, ignored and suffering, and it’s up to me to do something about it.

“Let my heart be broken by the things that break the heart of God.” — Bob Pierce, founder of World Vision

2 Responses to “Feeding Jesus”

  1. Denise Combs Says:

    I was sick and in the hospital and you came to see me when I was lonely. You made me feel good, I thought I was worth something because you came to visit me. You did this for my father and you were doing this onto Jesus. My father loved Jesus very much. You did this for him you did this for Jesus. I have to say we were in a very tough position at one time in our life. We lost a home, a car and much more because we lost our jobs. Now these are just material things and we will recover. However I did think at the time if all my brothers and sisters could have gave us $1.00 we would have made it through (some did). Jesus has our lives planned and we have accepted what happened but perhaps there is someone we should be helping we are not. If you know of that person let me know I am in for the $1.00 (or more) I bet it would grow very fast and help someone hungry, thirsty, homeless or sick.

    Like

  2. Cheryl Says:

    There were a couple of things about this book that I didn’t like, and I’ll probably end up writing about them. But like you, I found I had to stop in my tracks and ask the question, “Am I doing enough?” If that’s all Richard Stearns has accomplished with this book, it’s enough because it’s the first step toward North American Christians fulfilling their responsibility in God’s world. Wouldn’t it be great if every church in the U.S. made it required reading and the platform from which they moved outside the walls of their building? If individuals and churches would put this book into action, we could accomplish a lot.

    Like


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