The Pastor In Prayer (book review)

Charles Spurgeon was called (and rightly so!) “the prince of preachers.” I think in large part this was because Spurgeon’s sermons were so steeped in God’s Word. But Spurgeon was also renown for his moving prayers, and again I think this is due to the biblical content that was used to weave these prayers. We get a small sample of these prayers in The Pastor In Prayer.

In D.L. Moody’s first sermon at his church in Chicago, he recounted his time visiting Spurgeon’s church. The editor of The Pastor In Prayer summarizes Moody’s words this way: “What impressed him most was not the praise, though he thought he had never heard such grand congregational singing; it was not Mr. Spurgeon’s exposition, fine though it was, nor even his sermon; it was his prayer. He seemed to have such access to God that he could bring down the power from heaven; that was the great secret of his influence and his success.”

Truly prayer is the fuel for any meaningful church activity. We are blessed to have access to these moving, fueling prayers which Spurgeon prayed over his congregation every week. We can hear echoes of his sermon, challenges to draw closer to God, calls to repentance, pleas for revival, blessings on his congregation and on his country.

Truly Spurgeon’s prayers are as memorable and moving as are his sermons!

Pastor, I urge you to read this book and follow Spurgeon’s monumental example in praying for your congregation and in calling them to bolster their own prayer life. But even if you are not in the pastorate, all Christians can be inspired to greater depth in prayer by Mr. Spurgeon’s moving, passionate prayers.

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