Thursdays With Oswald—How To Think About Sin

This is a weekly series with things I’m reading and pondering from Oswald Chambers. You can read the original seed thought here, or type “Thursdays With Oswald” in the search box to read more entries.

How To Think About Sin

     We have to face the problem that our hearts may be right with God while our heads have a startling affinity with a great deal that is antagonistic to the Bible teaching. What we need, and what we get if we go on with God, is an intellectual re-birth as well as a heart re-birth.

     The trouble with the modern statements regarding sin is that they make sin far too slight. Sin according to the modern view simply means selfishness, and preachers and teachers are as dead against selfishness as the New Testament is. Immediately we come to the Bible we find that sin is much deeper than that. According to the Bible, sin in its final analysis is not a defect but a defiance, a defiance that means death to the life of God in us. …

     According to the Bible, sin is doing without God. Sin is not wrong doing, it is wrong being, deliberate and emphatic independence of God.

From Biblical Ethics

Sometimes I just have to read Oswald Chambers, let it soak in, read it again, and then sit back and exhale deeply. His profound insights into how a Christian should live always seem to hit me right between the eyes.

Here’s what I’m pondering: “The trouble with the modern statements regarding sin is that they make sin far too slight.” Do I make excuses for sin? Do I say, “It’s not that big of a deal”?

And this: “Sin is not wrong doing, it is wrong being, deliberate and emphatic independence of God.” Am I living each and every moment totally dependent on God? It’s when I think I can do it on my own that I am the most vulnerable to sinning.

One Response to “Thursdays With Oswald—How To Think About Sin”

  1. Craig T. Owens Says:

    Just read a great quote from Jerry Bridges that goes along with this —

    Typically, if we are not actually murderers, felons, or adulterers, we tend to think of our common sins as no more serious than a parking violation. We are so used to living with pride, selfishness, envy, gossip, and a whole host of other “respectable sins” that we don’t even think of them as sin.

    But the fact is that, as serial sinners, we are all as guilty before God as that murderer. You and I sin every day in thought, word, deed, and motive. And whether those sins appear great or small in our own sight, in reality every sin we commit is an act of rebellion against God, a rejection and attempted negation of His sovereignty and rulership over us.

    Like


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